• CEO of iSec announced as panellist at inaugural Thames Estuary Development Conference

Stephen Lawrence, CEO of leading logistics property developers iSec, has been announced as a panellist at the inaugural Thames Estuary Development Conference taking place on 3 April at ExCel London.

Stephen will discuss the huge potential of the Thames Estuary to support unprecedented growth in the region, driving the UK’s manufacturing and logictics models towards Industry 4.0 and reinforcing the message that the estuary is well and truly open for business.

Stephen said: “The UK is crying out for world class transport and distribution links to secure its place as a world class economic power.

“The introduction of the megaport at London Gateway a few years ago began a seismic shift in the logistics model of the UK. The region has attracted a new injection of capital as forward-thinking developments in the region, like Thames Enterprise Park, are helping to bring the UK food, energy and distribution model into the 21st century.

The Thames Estuary’s proximity to London, international trade capacity via its own ports, globally renowned research and development centres, and the availability of availability of land to deliver homes and employment will create the infrastructure and transport links the UK needs.

Stephen will speak on the opening panel for the day, chaired by Adam Bryan, managing director of South East Local Enterprise Partnership (SELEP), who will introduce the day with a discussion on how the estuary can really punch its weight regionally, nationally and internationally, communicate its 2050 vision and take its place as the UK’s leading logistics hub.

Also joining the panel will be experts from the logistics industries including Kate Willard of Stobart Group, Matthew Norwell of Thames Gateway Partnership and Lynn Carpenter of Thurrock Council.

The UK’s current system falls far short of maximising production and energy efficiencies. By clustering together all operations on a single multi-modal superhub near London and the South East, which accounts for 40 percent of the UK’s food consumption, the potential for time and resource saving is huge.